About your Search

20121002
20121010
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9
and live. [applause] moderator: same question to you. would you do to promote job growth in iowa? steve: i look back to when i first served in the iowa senate and the unemployment rate was at just over 2%. i know what that looks like. i have gone to work, like a lot of other people, especially in northern and western iowa and advocated what was done during the crisis years of the 80's which is that we need value added agriculture. all new wealth comes from the land. i was att's from field in mind. what you understand about the global economy to menasha economy, you can really understand the economy. we have done very well. one of the very people supporting renewal energies which added more dollars per acre. today the value of products, $24 billion. and i was elected to congress was 12 billion. ag was 60 billion then, now over 200. we created a tremendous amount of wealth that has been built within the value added ag component of this. let's keep it up and keep taxes low unpredictable and let's have less government regulations and less intrusion in our lives. [applause] moderator: 30 second
". [laughter] >> you could make it up but why bother? there it is. want to thank steve and just in case he has the urge to start drinking heavily we supplied him with a case of pbr back there on ice. that is how he celebrates. the annual mrc dishonors award has its winners chosen by a distinguished cross-section of the vast right-wing conspiracy department of media affairs. you may not have known that existed but it does. for our galas it always been a star-studded assembly and this year is no exception. this year we have, for 2012, 12 judges and it is my pleasure to introduce them to you. ♪ . ♪ . ♪ >> all right. our third and final presenter this evening is a man who of course needs no introduction but he is going to get one anyway just in case. he's well-known in the conservative movement as both an intellectual heavy lifter and one of our best and cleverist humorists. more importantly he is a past presenter for our dishonors awards. he is the founding editor of nationalreview.online and is currently editor-at-large for nro. he is a visiting fellow at aei and a fox news contributor. ho
like to recognize steve who is with us today, his research partner in this effort, decided that they wanted after the embassy attacks to dig in to where the american public is on these questions today, how they are struggling to interpret events in the middle east. in light of the attacks but beyond the embassy attacks themselves. and so he will be providing us today with an overview of the results of their work, a new poll that was conducted jus jusa week and a half ago, less. so extremely fresh outlook opinion data. we are going to take that data and analysis and add to it some contextual analysis from two very seasoned observers, william galston, the ezra k. zilkha chair and governance studies here at the brookings institution, a seasoned observer of american politics, and culture, and also a thoughtful skull on issues of religion and culture and politics, and a seasoned observer of arab politics and with these two gentlemen as our assistance today, we will be able to take a broader look at how the arab world are looking at the united states and the u.s. public is lookin
the course of two years. tom hendricks who since moved on and steve brown for tremendous work. literally, hundreds of volunteers working in work groups and task groups led by rtca with margaret jenni, and i want to thank everybody for the help over the years. just as the members are engaged in our work, we've been very pleased with the knowledge and level of engagement by acting administrator, first serving as the faa deputy administrator, mike call's become more, not less active in the work since being elevated to the role of acting administrator. with michael at the helm, his interests, and working closely with the community, i'm confident in the ability to overcome barriers to implementing next generation. you commented about succession planning, and i'm pleased with my chairmanmanship sunsetting, and i'll remain on the committee, bill ayer, chairman of the alaska air group, and bill's been formally leading the alaska air group as chairman and ceo, an experienced aveuater, is taking over the chairmanmanship on a go-forward basis passing the baton at wright patterson air force base her
to design as steve squires explains. we notice it with the pan cam wide-angle camera. we hit it with a mini test to check for iron. it looks interesting, and we go over and we figure out its molecular composition with the apsx. everything works together. having instruments that work together encourages the teams to work together. this was squires' vision which he called science engineering. he said, you've got those sensors, and each of them provides complimentary bytes of knowledge. you're going to use the payload to the fullest advantage. if people look at it as being entirely at their disposal. if you were out there in the field, he says, doing geology with your field partner, you might be arguing about what this rock means or what that rock mean, but you're not going to be arguing about should we use the rock hammer or should we use the compass. we don't have pan cam guys arguing with mini test guys but rather geologists arguing with chemists about exploration. now, to appreciate that you need to know that this design and organization starkly contrasts with almost every other planetary
and the man the would like to be president. begin with steve in new york. you are on the air. good evening. >> caller: yes - level of the government is to protect basic rights and there is nothing more basic than clean air and water and this is what has totally been forgotten in the last year and a half, two years of the debate. the ecology is not even mentioned in this basically a simplifies modern man's complete this association and disconnection from the natural world to the point of nature distain. that is the basic difficulty. in fact, the attachment is so great that it's even skewed the perception of the reality. you are constantly hearing the word growth and overlooking one simple fact. you cannot grow indefinitely on a finite planet of the finite natural resources especially water. so, all of these candidates are neglecting this. and this is life itself and it has nothing to do with americans in the survival and i would like these candidates to address. when you consider energy more important than water. >> host: thanks from buffalo new york. what should the government be in our li
and how the instruments had been used and how the goals affected the plan tomorrow. in the words of steve's collier's the principal investigators of the mer mission, this has been the first overland expedition on another planet. applying the tools at the chosen spots along the martian landscape we've learned how water has affected the chemistry of soil and rocks and found places in the past that were similar to wear life thrives on earth. home plate for example an area behind the columbia hills is about 100 meters across edomite the remnants of hot springs like those we find at yellowstone national park. this is how the planet to the field science proceeds by recognizing minerals, formations and process these that are familiar to what we understand on our home planet. the success of what is called planetology on mars is partly why it is an exciting place to study. we are on another planet. but it looks and feels a bit like home. just as the mer scientists make analogies with earth, my study of the field science at mars started by comparing it to how the field of science is done on earth.
but it is rising. >> over on the right side here. >> steve space from w cbs radio. the pre-election polls i've always wondered why our listeners, viewers and readers need to know how other people plan to vote and poison the voting poll and recite them on the radio i'd like to hear the of a panelist thoughts on why do we report the polls? >> who wants to take that? >> it's the way that we gauge the narrative of the race in which way the momentum is. i was in virginia talking to people in prince william county and republicans who voted for john mccain four years ago. i don't know i'm going to do it doesn't like this is going to win it's not necessarily wanting to vote for the loser. it does affect some voters. >> on the other hand, it's not so where earlier in the cycle you say they didn't have a chance i'm not the only one who likes him and maybe he can pull this out and we are curious and want to know what other -- we also want to be part of the conversation with people and know what other people are thinking and i am not sure i think that is such a bad thing and need to be put into isolati
's steve is the first voice i hear in the morning, and he is. while melissa is a very competent and informed female voice, which i hear in the late afternoon on my way home. she was in china preparing for a weeklong broadcast with npr when a massive earthquake struck in may, 2008 and major news organizations around the world rely on her extensive reporting on the destruction and relief efforts. so now, i have many henry kissinger stories. i won't spend the full 15 minutes he demanded, but i will tell you -- [laughter] a few of them. let's try this. this past valentine's day he was my gate. well, what really happened is henry and i contacted our dear friends andrea mitchell and alan greenspan. we did this says separately about spending the evening with them and then we all ended in a downtown washington hotel room full of hearts and flowers. henry iain dhaka also sit next to each other at the defense policy board meetings and we just spent a day and a half doing that and discussing the very complicated issue of iran. at one of those meetings, henry told me -- this is very persona
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9